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Book Reviews

Talk To Me – Book Review

Steve Jobs seems to be quite a stubborn person once he wants something. Back in 2010, he wanted to buy a small startup in San Jose, California. The CEO at that time was Dag Kittlaus and his colleagues who had successfully raised for the second round and they did not want to sell it when they saw the potential of this “child”. Jobs contacted Kittlaus 37 days in a row until he fell in love and accepted to sell the two-year-old business to Apple for $ 150 million to $ 200 million. This company is named Siri Inc. Siri  –

Prediction Machine – Book Review

After reading the book “Prediction Machines,” written by three professors at Rotman School of Business Administration, I realized I was less interested in Grab or Google applications because one thing behind that supported them: Artificial intelligence (AI). AI has contributed greatly to these applications to predict the best direction for users. “Predict”, is what shapes the intelligence that humans are trying to reach. According to Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans and Avi Goldfarb, also an economist, data researcher for the Creative Destruction Lab, predictions are AI’s must-have output. “The current generation of AI provides the company so that they have full

Leading With Dignity – Book Review

Leading with Dignity is unlike any other book, opening with a story about a company that is on the verge of bankruptcy. At that time, the executives figured out how to negotiate with their employees so that they would accept a pay cut to “get together and win”. Employees believed it.  The company had to manage for 5 years, then it received positive signals. The leaders celebrated the occasion by rewarding themselves with generous bonuses but were not interested in returning these employees the salary they accepted before. A quick strike broke out when the relationship between administrators and employees

Breaking Bad Habits – Book Review

In the 80s of the last century, reading newspapers on the way to work seemed an endearing habit for office workers. At that time, people often did not wonder about newspapers being printed on oversized paper sizes (tabloid), although this made it difficult to read newspapers on the bus. But Freek Vermeulen does. He often complained about the clumsy size of this type of paper and wished to have a new standard to make the reading experience more comfortable. It took many years for strategic and business professionals at the London Business School to reconsider why the use of broad-based

The Surprising Science Of Meetings – Book Review

Aldous Huxley was wrong. Bad meetings – not mescaline – open the doors of perceptions. Disappointed meetings seem to have a strange human manipulation. At that time, the participant could do nothing but look around, nodding over, unconsciously checking the phone and nodding again. Such meetings are the strong inspiration for Steven G. Rogelberg to write the book “The Surprising Science of Meetings” – one of the most effective productivity meeting books ever. The authors of effective meeting guides often do not mention the impact of bad meetings. Instead, they often start with a series of statistics to catch readers’

Soon – Book Review

Around the end of 1934, a department store boss named Edgar Kaufmann asked Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home that he and his family could rest on weekends. The house was located in the forest southeast of Pittsburgh about an hour’s drive. At the time, this was an opportunity for Wright to regain his reputation, which had diminished after the Depression that was creeping into the United States. Also during these difficult years, his house and design studio were also threatened with confiscation because they did not pay the tax to the state. This talented architect came to the

That’s What She Said – Book Review

That’s What She Said – a fascinating book about women’s experiences in everyday business life – begins with the delicacy of author Joanne Lipman stating not any individual or group, as a promise to readers, especially her male readers. So readers may slowly embrace the fact that the world around us is overwhelmingly biased for men. As a former editor of USA Today, deputy editor of the Wall Street Journal, and editor-in-chief of Portfolio, Lipman, along with his keen eyes, has led readers to the story with the highest respect for truth. She gives an example of the temperature in